"""Description:We do really need this book as the law of evidence is becoming on...

«  » »Description:We do really need this book as the law of evidence is becoming one vast DNA test in many fields where the defence insists on challenging basic factual statements (on instructions from the client, of course). The questions really are – what use is this book and does it help me with my work? The answer to both questions is a resounding `yes’. DNA is now the indispensable weapon in the fight against crime because it allows both the unambiguous identification of the defendant from traces of biological material left at the scene of a crime, whilst acquitting the innocent. In plain English, `Dealing with DNA Evidence’ states how DNA evidence is actually obtained – something many of us are totally unfamiliar with. Semikhodskii describes the various types of DNA test which are available and what the weaknesses of DNA testing are. For the benefit of both the judiciary and the defence, the author explains how DNA evidence can successfully be challenged in the courts so that the impact of such evidence can be minimised, or even dismissed completely. The defence advocate is given even greater assistance with strategies for refuting DNA evidence when presented and discussed during any stage of the criminal justice process. However, readers should note that the emphasis is squarely placed on DNA evidence so that it can be treated as just another piece of evidence which, of its own volition, would be insufficient to convict the defendant of a particular offence. Who should bother reading this book? Most students I remember from my Bar Vocational Course would run a mile rather than read something like this book. However, the book must be essential reading for students and practitioners of criminal law and practice, for forensic science and law, and for all practitioners within criminal justice management at whatever level because it is a unique sourcebook for twenty-first century advocacy which no professional criminal justice manager should be without today. Whilst the cases, statutes and regulations are relatively sparse for detail, I came away with the impression that `Dealing with DNA Evidence’ presents a fair balance of the tasks confronting advocates in this new frontier of proof. I always remember hearing a devastating question posed by the great Norman Birkett KC when he asked a hapless witness (allegedly expert) «  »what is the co-efficient of the expansion of brass? » » This expert didn’t know – round one to Birkett, even if the question was a bit unfair, and possibly irrelevant. What Semikhodskii goes on to say is that when an advocate is faced with scientific evidence, he «  »has to understand it and the prosecution scientist who presents it, as well as the scientist who is working for the defence team » ». Counsel will know that their defence job is to highlight the drawbacks of the prosecution analysis presented to a jury and also have the ability to question experts about the subtleties of their supposed scientific expertise. It is right to say that such questioning is undoubtedly true for DNA evidence because it will be possibly the most scientifically demanding types of evidence available to the Crown. There are eleven chapters in the book covering the following detailed areas of DNA law: An introduction to Criminal DNA Analysis



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